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RECENT ARRIVALS


Legacies
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Legacies

By Bette Bao Lord

1990. Hardcover. Like New. Bette Lord tells 'the story of China through my own story, the stories of my family and those of a number of the people I met during my 40 months in China. As the very visible wife of Winston Lord, American Ambassador to China, Bette Lord is one of the few people who knows the authorities in Beijing as well as those who participated in the events of the 'China Spring' of 1989.

$15.00

The Boxer Rebellion

By Henry Keown-Boyd

1995. Hardcover. Very Good. Dust jacket shows its age and curling. The author explains the story behind that puzzling affair, a bizarre mixture of farce & tragedy which captured the world's headlines in the summer of 1900. The Boxers (a nickname derived from their official title, The Fists of Righteous Harmony) were a fanatical secret organization who had been incited by anti-foreign elements in the Chinese Government to commit wide-scale depredations against foreign missionaries & their Chinese converts. As the Dowager Empress Tzu Hsui stoutly maintained that the Boxers were beyond her control, matters came to a climax with the siege of the Peking Legations which lasted 55 days & the taking of Peit'ang Cathedral which lasted even longer. Troops from Russia, America, France, Japan, & Britain assembled for the relief of Peking. Here is a witty and shrewd analysis of the whole episode, which ended in total humiliation for the Chinese. 'A luminous, numinous, jade-cool book...'-- Literary Review. B&W photos.

$18.00

In the Ruins of Empire
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In the Ruins of Empire

By Ronald H. Spector

2007. Hardcover. New. The New York Times said of Ronald H. Spector's classic account of the American struggle against the Japanese in World War II, "No future book on the Pacific War will be written without paying due tribute to Eagle Against the Sun." Now Spector has returned with a book that is even more revealing. In the Ruins of Empire chronicles the startling aftermath of this crucial twentieth-century conflict. With access to recently available firsthand accounts by Chinese, Japanese, British, and American witnesses and previously top secret U.S. intelligence records, Spector tells for the first time the fascinating story of the deadly confrontations that broke out–or merely continued–in Asia after peace was proclaimed at the end of World War II. Under occupation by the victorious Allies, this part of the world was plunged into new power struggles or back into old feuds that in some ways were worse than the war itself. In the Ruins of Empire also shows how the U.S. and Soviet governments, as they secretly vied for influence in liberated lands, were soon at odds. At the time of the peace declaration, international suspicions were still strong. Joseph Stalin warned that "crazy cutthroats" might disrupt the surrender ceremony in Tokyo Bay. Die-hard Japanese officers plotted to seize the emperor's palace to prevent an announcement of surrender, and clandestine relief forces were sent to rescue thousands of Allied POWs to prevent their being massacred.In the Ruins of Empire paints a vivid picture of the postwar intrigues and violence. In Manchuria, Russian "liberators" looted, raped, and killed innocent civilians, and a fratricidal rivalry continued between Chiang Kai-shek's regime and Mao's revolutionaries. Communist resistance forces in Malaya settled old scores and terrorized the indigenous population, while mujahideen holy warriors staged reprisals and terror killings against the Chinese–hundreds of innocent civilians were killed on both sides. In Indochina, a nativist political movement rose up to oppose the resumption of French colonial rule; one of the factions that struggled for supremacy was the Communist Viet Minh led by Ho Chi Minh. Korea became a powder keg with the Russians and Americans entangled in its north and south. And in Java, as the Indonesian novelist Idrus wrote, people brutalized by years of Japanese occupation "worshipped a new God in the form of bombs, submachine guns, and mortars."Through impeccable research and provocative analysis, as well as compelling accounts of American, British, Indian, and Australian soldiers charged with overseeing the surrender and repatriation of millions of Japanese in the heart of dangerous territory, Spector casts new and startling light on this pivotal time–and sets the record straight about this contested and important period in history.

$15.00

The Imperial Cruise
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The Imperial Cruise

By James Bradley

2009. Hardcover. Like New. Minor wear on dust jacket. In 1905 President Teddy Roosevelt dispatched Secretary of War William Howard Taft on the largest U.S. diplomatic mission in history to Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, China, and Korea. Roosevelt's glamorous twenty-one year old daughter Alice served as mistress of the cruise, which included senators and congressmen. On this trip, Taft concluded secret agreements in Roosevelt's name. In 2005, a century later, James Bradley traveled in the wake of Roosevelt's mission and discovered what had transpired in Honolulu, Tokyo, Manila, Beijing and Seoul. In 1905, Roosevelt was bully-confident and made secret agreements that he though would secure America's westward push into the Pacific. Instead, he lit the long fuse on the Asian firecrackers that would singe America's hands for a century.

$10.00