Contemporary Fiction

From The Kite Runner to The Catcher In the Rye, from The Forgotten Garden to Sarah's Key, we can help you find the contemporary fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.nz, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in Contemporary Fiction

The Kite Runner

The Kite Runner

by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner is a novel by the author Khaled Hosseini. Published in 2003 by Riverhead Books, it is Hosseini's first novel, and was adapted into a film of the same name in 2007.
Alchemist

Alchemist

by Paulo Coelho

This book is a fable, told in simple language, of an Andalusian shepherd boy who forsakes his comfortable, predictable life and follows his dream.
"I don’t live in either my past or my future. I’m interested only in the present. If you can concentrate always on the present, you’ll be a happy man. Life will be a party for you, a grand festival, because life is the moment we’re living now."
The Secret Life Of Bees

The Secret Life Of Bees

by Sue Monk Kidd

The Secret Life of Bees is a 2002 historical novel by American author Sue Monk Kidd. It received much critical acclaim and was a New York Times bestseller. It was nominated for the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction and was adapted into a 2008 film by Gina Prince-Bythewood starring Dakota Fanning, Queen Latifah, Alicia Keys and Jennifer Hudson.
The Road

The Road

by Cormac McCarthy

The Road is a 2006 novel by American writer Cormac McCarthy. It is a post-apocalyptic tale of a journey taken by a father and his young son over a period of several months, across a landscape blasted by an unnamed cataclysm that destroyed all civilization and, apparently, almost all life on earth. The novel was awarded the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction in 2006.
Harry Potter and The Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and The Half-Blood Prince

by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on 16 July 2005, is the sixth of seven novels from British author J. K. Rowling's popular Harry Potter series. Set during Harry Potter's sixth year at Hogwarts, the novel explores Lord Voldemort's past, and Harry's preparations for the final battle amidst emerging romantic relationships and the emotional confusions and conflict resolutions characteristic of mid-adolescence.
Life Of Pi

Life Of Pi

by Yann Martel

Life of Pi is a fantasy adventure novel written by Canadian author Yann Martel. In the story, the protagonist Piscine "Pi" Molitor Patel, an Indian boy from Pondicherry, explores issues of spirituality and practicality from an early age. He survives227 days after a shipwreck, while stranded on a boat in the Pacific Ocean. The novel was first published by Knopf Canada in September 2001, and the UK edition won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction the following year.
Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows

Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows

by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final of the Harry Potter novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The book was released on 21 July 2007, ending the series that began in 1997 with the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. This book chronicles the events directly following Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), and leads to the long-awaited final confrontation between Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort.
The Help

The Help

by Kathryn Stockett

The Help is a 2009 novel by American author Kathryn Stockett. It is about African American maids working in white households in Jackson, Mississippi during the early 1960s. The novel is told from the perspective of three characters.
Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire

Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire

by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4) keeps having horrible dreams that wake him with the scar on his forehead throbbing. He is relieved to return to the magical realm from his summer break early to attend the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys, but the relief quickly gives way to a dark threat that looms over the magical world.Being a teenager is hard enough without having a Dark Lord seeking your destruction!


Hugo Award for Best Novel (2001), Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for... Read more
Catch-22

Catch-22

by Joseph Heller

Catch-22 is Joseph Heller’s first novel and his most
acclaimed work. Set during World War II, the novel uses a distinctive non-chronological
third-person omniscient narration, mainly focusing on the life of Captain John
Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. Occasionally, the narrator
also shows us how other characters, such as the chaplain or Hungry Joe,
experience the world around them. As the novel’s events are described from the
different points of view through separate... Read more
Harry Potter and The Order Of the Phoenix

Harry Potter and The Order Of the Phoenix

by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) shows us how the plot begins to thicken in this renowned series.  The tale grows darker and becomes psychologically intense as the teenaged boy wizard much handle his social life as well as the dark forces that seek to take him down!

The greater community begins to doubt Harry and the existence of Voldemort's return, and Hogwarts is overtaken by an oppressive representative from the Ministry of Magic.  We meet the dread Dementors, and Harry... Read more
A New Earth

A New Earth

by Eckhart Tolle

A New Earth, Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose is a book by New Age author Eckhart Tolle. It is the follow-up to the book, The Power of Now. It was first published in 2005. It has been on the New York Times Best Seller list, and has grown in popularity since Oprah Winfrey recommended it for her book club in January of 2008.
Night

Night

by Elie Wiesel

Original German Title: Un di Velt Hot Geshvign
In Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a pious teenager is guilt-ridden because he survived the Nzai death camps, and yet his family was killed. He questions his faith, the loss of his innocense, and the nature of evil that can allow such genocide to occur.
Elie Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.
“For in the end, it is all about memory, its sources and its magnitude, and, of course, its consequences.”
East Of Eden

East Of Eden

by John Steinbeck

East of Eden is a novel by Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck, published in September 1952. Often described as Steinbeck's most ambitious novel, East of Eden brings to life the intricate details of two families, the Trasks and the Hamiltons, and their interwoven stories. The novel was originally addressed to Steinbeck's young sons, Thom and John (then 6½ and 4½ respectively). Steinbeck wanted to describe the Salinas Valley for them in detail: the sights, sounds, smells, and colors.
The Crossing

The Crossing

by Cormac McCarthy

Cormac McCarthy was born in Rhode Island in1933 and spent most of his childhood near Knoxville, Tennessee. He served in the U.S. Air Force and later studied at the University of Tennessee. In 1976 he moved to El Paso, Texas, where he lives today.  McCarthy's fiction parallels his movement from the Southeast to the West--the first four novels being set in Tennessee, the last three in the Southwest and Mexico. The Orchard Keeper (1965) won the Faulkner Award for a first novel; it was followed by... Read more
The Glass Castle

The Glass Castle

by Jeannette Walls

Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his childrenâÈçs imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldnâÈçt stand the... Read more
The Notebook

The Notebook

by Nicholas Sparks

The Notebook is a 1996 American romantic novel by American novelist Nicholas Sparks. The novel was later adapted into a popular romance film by the same name in 2004. However, the movie and the book have very different endings. The novel was Nicholas Sparks' first published novel, and the third written after The Passing and The Royal Murders, which were never published. It was written over a period of six months in 1994.
Eat, Pray, Love

Eat, Pray, Love

by Elizabeth Gilbert

This beautifully written, heartfelt memoir touched a nerve among both readers and reviewers. Elizabeth Gilbert tells how she made the difficult choice to leave behind all the trappings of modern American success (marriage, house in the country, career) and find, instead, what she truly wanted from life. Setting out for a year to study three different aspects of her nature amid three different cultures, Gilbert explored the art of pleasure in Italy and the art of devotion in India, and then a balance... Read more
The Devil In the White City

The Devil In the White City

by Erik Larson

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic and Madness at the Fair that Changed America is a 2004 non-fiction book by Erik Larson presented in a novelistic style. The book is based on real characters and events.
The Curious Incident Of the Dog In the Night-Time

The Curious Incident Of the Dog In the Night-Time

by Mark Haddon

Wondrous-Brilliantly inventive, full of dazzling set pieces- Not simply the most original novel I've read in years-it's also one of the best' The TimesThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a murder mystery novel like no other. The detective, and narrator, is Christopher Boone. Christopher is fifteen and has Asperger's, a form of autism. He knows a very great deal about maths and very little about human beings. He loves lists, patterns and the truth. He hates the colours yellow and brown... Read more
Tuesdays With Morrie

Tuesdays With Morrie

by Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with Morrie is a 1997 non-fiction book by American writer Mitch Albom. The story was later adapted by Thomas Rickman into a TV movie of the same name directed by Mick Jackson, which aired on 5 December 1999 and starred Hank Azaria. It tells the true story of sociologist Morrie Schwartz and his relationship with his students. Both the film and the book chronicle the lessons about life that Mitch learns from his professor, who is dying. After five years in hardcover, it was released as a trade... Read more
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To Kill a Mockingbird

by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.
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The Catcher In the Rye

by J D Salinger

Published in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye has become a common part of high school and college curricula throughout the English-speaking world and has been translated into all major languages. Since its publication with a $3.00 sticker, it has reportedly sold more than 65 million copies. The novel's antihero, Holden Caulfield, has become a cultural icon for teenage rebellion. Due to its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and teenage angst, it has frequently been... Read more

Contemporary Fiction Books & Ephemera

The Forgotten Garden

The Forgotten Garden

by Morton, Kate

From the #1 internationally bestselling author of The House at Riverton, a novel that takes the reader on an unforgettable journey through generations and across continents as two women try to uncover their familyâÈçs secret past
A tiny girl is abandoned on a ship headed for Australia in 1913. She arrives completely alone with nothing but a small suitcase containing a few clothes and a single bookâÈ'a beautiful volume of fairy tales. She is taken in by the dockmaster and his wife and raised as... Read more
The House At Riverton

The House At Riverton

by Morton, Kate

"Originally published in Australia in 2006 as The Shifting Fog by Allen & Unwin"--T.p. verso.
The Time Traveler\'s Wife

The Time Traveler's Wife

by Audrey, Niffenegger

A dazzling novel in the most untraditional fashion, this is the remarkable story of Henry DeTamble, a dashing, adventuresome librarian who travels involuntarily through time, and Clare Abshire, an artist whose life takes a natural sequential course. Henry and Clare's passionate love affair endures across a sea of time and captures the two lovers in an impossibly romantic trap, and it is Audrey Niffenegger's cinematic storytelling that makes the novel's unconventional chronology so vibrantly triumphant.An... Read more
The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible

by Kingsolver, Barbara

The Poisonwood Bible (1998) by Barbara Kingsolver is a bestselling novel about a missionary family, the Prices, who in 1959 move from Georgia to the fictional village of Kilanga in the Belgian Congo. The Prices' story, which parallels their host country's tumultuous emergence into the post-colonial era, is narrated by the five women of the family: Orleanna, long-suffering wife of Baptist missionary Nathan Price, and their four daughters – Rachel, Leah, Adah, and Ruth May.
Water For Elephants

Water For Elephants

by Gruen, Sara

Water for Elephants is a historical novel by Sara Gruen. The novel centers on Jacob Jankowski and his experiences in a travelling circus called The Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth. Gruen originally wrote the novel as part of National Novel Writing Month.
A Fine Balance

A Fine Balance

by Mistry, Rohinton

A Fine Balance is the third book by Rohinton Mistry. Set in Mumbai, India between 1975 and 1977 during the turmoil of The Emergency, a period of expanded government power and crackdowns on civil liberties, this book is about four characters from varied backgrounds—Dina Dalal, Ishvar Darji, his nephew Omprakash and the young lad Maneck—who come together and develop a bond. First published by McClelland and Stewart in 1995, it won the Giller Prize.
The Red Tent

The Red Tent

by Diamant, Anita

The red tent is the place where women would gather away from the men during births and menses. Imagine living a nomadic lifestyle around 1500 BCE, keeping time by the celestial orbs and the women stopping to assemble their tent.
The Red Tent is historical fiction. Author Anita Diamant expounds on the silence of the woman Dinah in the story of Genesis, retelling and recreating a time period in Biblical history through the eyes of the women.
 
Still Alice

Still Alice

by Genova, Lisa

Still Alice is a compelling debut novel about a 50-year-old woman's sudden descent into early onset Alzheimer's disease, written by first-time author Lisa Genova, who holds a Ph. D in neuroscience from Harvard University. Alice Howland, happily married with three grown children and a house on the Cape, is a celebrated Harvard professor at the height of her career when she notices a forgetfulness creeping into her life. As confusion starts to cloud her thinking and her memory begins to fail her, she... Read more
A Complicated Kindness

A Complicated Kindness

by Toews, Miriam

Miriam Toews (pronounced tâves) was born in 1964 in the small Mennonite town of Steinbach, Manitoba. She left Steinbach at 18, living in Montreal and London and touring Europe before coming back to Manitoba, where she earned her B.A. in film studies at the University of Manitoba. Later she packed up with her children and partner and moved to Halifax to attend the University of King’s College, where she received her bachelor’s degree in journalism. Upon returning to Winnipeg with her... Read more
Middlesex

Middlesex

by Eugenides, Jeffrey

Jeffrey Eugenides was born in 1960 in Detroit, Michigan, the son of an American-born father whose Greek parents emigrated from Asia Minor and an American mother of Anglo-Irish descent.After graduating from Brown University and Stanford University, in 1988 Jeffrey Eugenides published his first short story. His first novel, The Virgin Suicides, was published in 1993 to rapturous acclaim. The compelling, tender and wickedly humorous story of the five Lisbon sisters in “the year of the... Read more
The Birth House

The Birth House

by McKay, Ami

An arresting portrait of the struggles that women faced for control of their own bodies, The Birth House is the story of Dora Rare—the first daughter in five generations of Rares.As apprentice to the outspoken Acadian midwife Miss Babineau, Dora learns to assist the women of an isolated Nova Scotian village through infertility, difficult labors, breech births, unwanted pregnancies, and unfulfilling sex lives. During the turbulent World War I era, uncertainty and upheaval accompany the arrival of a... Read more
Late Nights On Air

Late Nights On Air

by Hay, Elizabeth

It’s 1975 when beautiful Dido Paris arrives at the radio station in Yellowknife, a frontier town in the Canadian north. She disarms hard-bitten broadcaster Harry Boyd and electrifies the station, setting into motion rivalries both professional and sexual. As the drama at the station unfolds, a proposed gas pipeline threatens to rip open the land and inspires many people to find their voices for the first time. This is the moment before television conquers the north’s attention, when the fate of the... Read more
A Secret Kept

A Secret Kept

by Rosnay, Tatiana De

The Distant Hours

The Distant Hours

by Morton, Kate

The Book Of Negroes

The Book Of Negroes

by Hill, Lawrence

Sarah\'s Key

Sarah's Key

by Rosnay, Tatiana De