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Paper & Ephemera Books & Ephemera


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    $147.00

    An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill giving a campaign speech using an improvised microphone stand during an election tour on 2 July 1945, 24 days before his Conservatives lost the General Election to Labour and Churchill relinquished his wartime premiership

    London: Keystone Press Agency, 1945. Photograph. This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill standing before an improvised microphone stand on 2 July 1945 while campaigning for the General Election, which his Conservatives would lose to Labour, ousting Churchill from his wartime premiership on 26 July 1945. The image, measuring 8 x 6 in (20.3 x 15.2 cm), is a gelatin silver print on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scratches with some light edge wear, cockling along the right edge, and some intermittent spotting, including at Churchill’s lips, that appears to be original to the photo’s developing out. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Keystone Press Agency Ltd.”, a received stamp dated 3 JUL 1945, and a typed caption dated “2.7.45.” and reading “CHURCHILL IN A HAPPY MOOD, ON HIS LEFT IS CAPTN. SIR W.W. WAKEFIELD CONSERVATIVE CANDIDATE FOR MARYLEBONE, FORMER RUGBY PLAYER.” The typed caption terminates with a Keystone number of “492560”. The General Election of July 1945 was Britain’s first since 1935. Churchill began campaigning on 26 May, just eighteen days after Britain celebrated VE Day. This photograph was taken on 2 July, as Churchill embarked on a tour of London. Despite the verso caption’s reference to the “enthusiastic crowds” there were apparently a number of vocal opponents during this tour where “the crowds were rowdy and there was some stone-throwing”. (Gilbert & Arnn, Documents Vol XXI, p 1810) Though Churchill had led the nation to victory, the Conservative Party’s ability to lead a postwar recovery was viewed with growing skepticism. The following day Churchill delivered his final campaign address before a crowd of over 20,000 at a stadium in Walthamstow at which a vehemently hostile faction was present. His 28-minute speech was interrupted throughout by catcalls and booing, as well as by cheers and applause. The environment was stormy enough that Churchill remarked upon the crowd’s participation many times throughout his speech. At the end of his speech he directly called out the opposition, “Where I think the booing party are making such a mistake is dragging all this stuff across the practical tasks we have to fulfil [sic]… They are going to be defeated at this election in a most decisive manner. Their exhibition here shows very clearly the sort of ideas they have of free speech.” (Collected Speeches, Vol VII, p 7203) The opposite outcome would shortly come to pass. Churchill had warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. Now, despite his personal popularity, his Conservative Party would cost him the premiership. On 26 July 1945, despite having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour’s landslide General Election victory over the Conservatives. He would be relegated to Leader of the Opposition for more than six years until the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpaced Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo once belonged to a working newspaper archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.


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    €10.00

    Rina Banerjee : Human Traffic (announcement) by Banerjee, Rina

    Paris: Galerie Nathalie Obadia, 2015 Card size: 15 x 21 cm. Recto: color photograph of the artist at work. Fine. Announcement. No Binding. Fine. Ephemera.


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    $75.00

    Sugar Bowl : The First Fifty Years: Promotional Poster by Mule, Marty

    Oxmoor House, Inc., 1983. SCARCE publisher's promotional poster,23 1/2"w x 20"h, featuring a sepia photograph of Frank Broyles in the 1944 Georgia Tech versus Tulsa Sugar Bowl game. Fine,as issued. Published in limited numbers for the ABA trade show in 1983. A poster well suited for framing, will be shipped loosely rolled in a mailing tube. . First Printing. Poster. Fine. 23 1/2"w x 20"h.


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    $2,055.99

    1940s - 1950s ORIGINAL GROUP OF HANDWRITTEN AND TYPED LETTERS SOME EPHEMERA RELATING TO THE FAMED EXPLORER AND HIS AUTHOR WIFE AND THE BELOVED, HISTORIC SCHOONER BOWDOIN by DONALD BAXTER MACMILLAN

    FREEPORT, MAINE SCHOONER BOWDOIN, 1950. On offer is a super, original archive of approximately 11 letters by or from Donald B. MacMillan or his wife, Miriam. Most of the letters are written to James Wiles of Maine in the late 1940s and 1950s are informal letters discussing Captain MacMillan's speaking engagements and tours, and a request for the help of Wiles to serve as an engineer or help with the fitting of the Schooner Bowdoin. Several are signed 'Mac.' Some with envelopes bear the typed return address 'Last Voyage Arctic Schooner Bowdoin.' Some letters from Miriam discuss her book 'Green Seas and White Ice,' and the positive and negative reviews of it. A number of news clippings related to MacMillan are included. One piece is a Christmas card apparently sent from the M.S. Brilliant, with an illustration of the ship signed Francis Wiles. Some soiling, staining, fold creases and other general wear but overall G. BIO NOTES: From Wikipedia: Donald Baxter MacMillan (November 10, 1874 - September 7, 1970) was an American explorer, sailor, researcher and lecturer who made over 30 expeditions to the Arctic during his 46-year career. He pioneered the use of radios, airplanes, and electricity in the Arctic, brought back films and thousands of photographs of Arctic scenes, and put together a dictionary of the Inuktitut language. On March 18, 1935, MacMillan married Miriam Norton Look, the daughter of his long-time friends Jerome and Amy Look. Though MacMillan at first refused to let her accompany him north, Miriam soon convinced him of her willingness and ability to participate in his Arctic travels. She participated in several of his scientific and exploration trips to the Arctic and elsewhere.. Good+. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Manuscript.


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    $168.00

    An original wartime press photograph of First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill touring the RAF Headquarters in France on 7 January 1940, less than half a year before Churchill's ascension to the premiership, the Dunkirk evacuation, and the fall of France

    London: Fox Photos, 11 January 1940. Photograph. This original press photo captures First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill touring the Royal Air Force Headquarters in France on 7 January 1940, less than half a year before his ascension to wartime premier, the evacuation of Dunkirk, and the fall of France. The image, measuring 9.5 x 7.5 in (24.1 x 17 cm), is a gelatin silver print on heavy matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing and scratches, its chief flawing being a .75 in closed tear perpendicular to the right edge. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Fox Photos”, a stamp of the Evening Standard dated 11 JAN 1940, and a typed caption indicating that this is an official RAF photograph with copyright held by the Crown. The caption is titled “The Royal Air Force in France” and reads “Photo taken during the visit to France of the Rt. Hon. Mr. Winston Churchill, the First Lord of the Admiralty.” It is worth noting that the original caption’s date of “Jan. 10th. 1940” for Churchill’s “tour of Headquarters” is incorrect. On 4 January 1940 First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill embarked on a four-day visit of France, a nation on the brink of invasion. Just twelve months prior Churchill had been in political exile, an elder statesman of 64 whose warnings against the growing Nazi threat had gone substantially unheeded. But in September 1939, at the outbreak of the Second World War, Churchill was called back to the Admiralty, filling the same position he held in the previous war. On this trip Churchill visited the Maginot Line, the headquarters of General Gort (head of the British Expeditionary Force), and a number of RAF squadrons stationed in France, where this photograph captures him on 7 January. Following Churchill’s return to England on 8 January, a press statement was released. Churchill encouraged the public that he “visited a British Brigade which is in direct contact with the enemy and found them in splendid spirits… Anyone at home who feels a bit gloomy or fretful about the war would benefit very much by spending a few days with the French and British Armies. They would find it at once a tonic and a sedative.” (Gilbert, Documents Vol XIV, 617) Five months later Churchill became wartime Prime Minister, and shortly after swift Nazi subjugation of France required the dramatic rescue of Allied forces trapped in northern France. An incredible mobilization of British civilians helped effect a near-miraculous evacuation of 224,000 British and 111,000 French soldiers. In recognition of this effort Churchill gave one of his most defining – and defiant – wartime speeches. In his 4 June 1940 speech he set the tone that would carry his nation through long years of war still ahead: “We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender…” This press photo once belonged to the working archive of the Evening Standard. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.


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    $1,385.99

    c1820s ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF PAINT RECIPES AND FORMULA HANDWRITTEN BY A NEW BURY ENGLAND MAN by ROBERT HAWORTH

    RADCLIFFE AT NEW BURY , 1825. Offered is an original, early 19th Century [circa 1820s] manuscript leather covered notebook of paint formulas for general house painting and furniture decorating. Pages are numbered 4 - 43 with handwritten formulas. Pages 37 - 45 have suffered chemical burns at the bottom of the pages but affecting text only on pages 39 and 40. There are additional formulas written on loose pages. All told there are 39 pages of handwritten recipes. The notebook measures 7¼ x 4½ inches. The name Robert Haworth and "Radcliffe @ New Bury" are written a couple of times in the front and back which would be in England. Overall Fair.. Fair. 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall. Manuscript.


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    $75.00

    Set of 10 WWII New Guinea Real picture postcards

    Danville Illinois: Grogan Photo Company, 1945. New Guinea post cards, with part of the original of the envelope, stating sent from Pvt. Robt. T. McCabe from HDQ Base X, APO 75, c/o P.M. San Francisco, California. Unused, black & white cards, very good condition. Scenes include native huts, a beach, church services in New Guinea (showing white men), natives of New Guinea (quite distant), coconut trees, a chapel, open air theater, a highway, a warehouse (US Army), and a native family, with husband, wife and child in front of native hut.


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    £15.00

    Japanese Chacha (Calypso) | Avril aux Antilles (Fernanda Calypso) [Musicians Vintage French Piano Sheet Music] + Individual Sheets Of Music For Parts of the Orchestra by Fernand Warms, Ray Devil, Marcel Combre, Juan Vareno, (Music) and (Lyrics)

    Published by Éditions M. R. Braun and L. Philippo, 24 Boulevard Poissonnière, Paris 1958. 1958., 1958. Vintage sheet music in illustrated green, black and cream printed paper covers. 10¾'' x 7''. Contains 16 pages folding sheet music including the covers. In Very Good condition. Member of the P.B.F.A.


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    $210.00

    An original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill dressed for a fox hunt with the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt at Chartwell Farm, the home of his daughter and son-in-law, on 27 November 1948

    London: The 'Topical' Press Agency, 29 November 1948. Photograph. This original press photo captures Winston S. Churchill dressed in his fox hunt kit on 27 November 1948. The image, measuring 10.25 x 8 in (26 x 20.3 cm), is a gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp and clean with only light edge wear confined to the margins and minor scuffing visible only under raking light. This is a crisp, high contrast image. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “The ‘Topical’ Press Agency” and a typed caption reading “A birthday picture of Mr. Winston Churchill, Britain’s war-time Premier, who is 74 to-morrow. This picture was taken on Saturday, when he rode with the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt, which met at Chartwell Farm, Sevenoaks, Kent, the home of his son-in-law, Captain Soames.” In addition to his numerous accomplishments, interests, and obsessions Churchill maintained a lifelong love of horses. At Sandhurst, training for the cavalry, Churchill graduated second in the arduous riding competition. At Omdurman he participated in “the last significant cavalry charge in British history”. He was a talented polo player who did not play his last game until age 52. And as soon as his finances allowed in the last decades of his life, Churchill kept a stable of racehorses and found some success as an owner and breeder. On 27 November 1948, three days before his 74th birthday, Churchill joined the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt, a foxhunting pack dating back to the 19th century, on their first ever hunt embarking from Chartwell. Though Churchill had given up riding years before, he hired a horse from a nearby stable and joined with enthusiasm. The hunt met in the morning and set off following the hounds until lunchtime. Newspapers reported that “scent was picked up, but was poor owing to the sun, and was lost.” Of her septuagenarian father’s feat Mary Soames later wrote, “It really was quite an achievement, but we were all deeply relieved when, having made his point, Winston did not make a habit of riding again.” (Soames, Churchill Family Album, p. 370) This experience may have helped rekindle Churchill’s love of horses; in 1949 he purchased the first of an eventual 38 racehorses. His post-war years of relative leisure came to an end with the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpolled Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo originated from The ‘Topical’ Press Agency. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.


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    $12.00

    The realist [unnumbered supplement]; December, 1968. A day in the life of an Oakland Seven, by Reese Erlich by Krassner, Paul, ed. [Reese Erlich

    New York: the every-other-monthly, 1968. Single folio leaf folded once to make 4p., printed double-column on newsprint, a bit browned with a tiny tear, 8.25x10.75 inches. Editorial note says "Funds are urgently needed to aid in the defense of the Oakland Seven. Send what you can afford to.." Reese Erlich's text runs about a thousand words, less than half the total, the remainder devoted to Edmund Levin imagining how media will treat the inevitable first astronaut death, and some bits & pieces. // FYI, just like Realist numbers that have been coded with a letter added, this issue is a not-for-sale supplement issued free to subscribers, this one not coded either because it is a fund-raiser, or because at this point in time the supplements were experimental.


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    $12.00

    Experience with Russia [foreword by G. D. Mentz, Rear-Admiral USN (ret.) ] by Hryshko, Vasyl I

    New York: Ukrainian Congress Committee of America, Inc, 1956. 180p., 9.5x6.5 inch leatherette boards gilt in decorated dj, jacket is worn and rubbed, an else very good copy. Hryshko spent four years imprisoned during the 1930s (mostly at the Kolyma gold mines) and "during the war the author took an active jpart in the Ukrainian Nationalist underground, fighting both the Nazis and Communists


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    CAD $5.00

    Ex-libris Québec. Révd. H. Gagnon, ptre

    Québec Ex-libris bibliothèque Révd. H. Gagnon, ptre. Format 9 x 5cm


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    €10.00

    Marie José Burki - 2 documents by Burki, Marie José

    1) 'wordswordswords', Gallery Sofie Van De Velde, Antwerpen, 2017. Announcement for groupshow. Diptych; page size: 21 x 15 cm. Frontimage: 'Wordswordswords' by Marie Jose Burki, 2014. New. --- 2a) 'Marie Jose Burki - Un chien sur la route, au passage du promeneur', CRP Nord Pas-de-Calais, Douchy-les-Mines, 2017. Flyer/mini-poster. Folded: 15 x 21 cm; unfold: 30 x 42 cm. New. --- 2b) ) 'Marie Jose Burki - Un chien sur la route, au passage du promeneur', CRP Nord Pas-de-Calais, Douchy-les-Mines, 2017. Announcement card. Size: 15 x 10,5 cm. Front: color photograph : 'M1 et M2, 2012'. Reverse: text printed black on white. New. First Edition. Fine. Ephemera.


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    $1,495.99

    1796 SUPER, ORIGINAL HANDWRITTEN FRENCH REVOLUTIONARY ERA STAMPLESS LETTER BETWEEN HOROLOGISTS AT THE APEX OF TIME KEEPING HISTORY IN DECIMAL CALENDAR AND CLOCKS FRANCE by COUSIN PLUMERY

    PARIS FRANCE to SARRAGOSSE ESPAYNE , 1796. On offer is a absolutely super, original 18th Century French language stampless letter dated 1796 with postmarks for Lyon et al, being a manuscript relic of one of the most active and extraordinary of times for French watchmakers, horologists and timekeepers who were in the spotlight during these early days of the French Revolution and onset of the Napoleonic era as the Decimal Calendar and time system was conceived and implemented. The three [3] page letter is signed from cousin 'Plumery' who send his regards to Margaret and her beau Pierre (Odet?) responding a past letter. Postmarked French Revolutionary Year 5, addressed to Odet, Horlogerie, a Sarragosse, Espayne par Via Perpignan (Zaragoza in English; a district of Aragon; Spain; by way of the Pyrenees.) While untranslated for the most part the letter appears to cover personal and business matters mentioning Paris, 79 Prennast du Pagrien and 79 Gervais, the watchmaker's district at that time. Ms Boncillion of Paris is also mentioned. The 'Odet' the letter was sent to, we believe, relates to one of two noted horologists named Odet: Odet Etienne; as stated online: 'Maître horloger genevois. Forme Louis Gabriel Colladon en 1779.' Or Odet Pierre-François: 'Fils de Gabriel. Origianaire de Genthod, environs de Genève. Horloger. Reçu habitant de Genève en 1756.' There is a 1" side edge fold separation, two small holes where the seal was opened but overall G.. Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Manuscript.


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    $263.00

    An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill, accompanied by his wife, Clementine, in his Woodford constituency on 26 May 1945 giving his first speech of the 1945 General Election that would end his wartime premiership two months later on 26 July 1945

    London: Pictorial Press Ltd., 1945. Photograph. This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill accompanied by his wife, Clementine, in his Woodford constituency on 26 May 1945 giving his first speech of the 1945 General Election that would end his wartime premiership two months later on 26 July 1945. This is a gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper and is notably large, measuring 9.5 x 12 in (24.1 x 30.5 cm). Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp and clean with some wear along the edges, bruising to the corners, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Pictorial Press Ltd.”, a stamp of the “International Magazine Service”, and some handwritten notations. The General Election of July 1945 was Britain’s first since 1935. Churchill started campaigning with a 26 May visit to his Woodford constituency, where this photograph was taken. Britain had celebrated VE day just eighteen days earlier. Despite the rain, great crowds showed up to express their admiration and get a glimpse of the man who led them to victory. The experience was an emotional one for Churchill; newspapers reported that the Premier shed a tear as he was greeted by the crowds. “It was not ‘the Prime Minister, the Right Hon Winston Churchill’ visiting his division, but ‘Our member, Mr. Churchill.’ Sometimes it was even ‘Dear old Winnie.’” (Chelmsford Chronicle, 1 June 1945) Churchill gave a stirring speech from the back of an open car, in which he and Clementine are here pictured. Churchill’s opening words of celebration turned sharply to the reality at hand, “The great victory in Europe has been won. Enormous problems lie before us.” Churchill had warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. Now, despite his personal popularity and a resounding personal victory in his Woodford constituency, his Conservative Party would cost him the premiership. On 26 July 1945, despite having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour’s landslide General Election victory over the Conservatives. He would be relegated to Leader of the Opposition for more than six years until the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpaced Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo once belonged to a working newspaper archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.


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    $15.00

    Land Deed "Know all Men by These Presents, That J. John Horswell of Seekonk in the County of Bristol and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Merchant, in Consideration of Two Thousand Eight Hundred Dollars, Paid by John P. Battey of Providence..." by Horswell, John J

    Providence, RI: N/A. Fair with no dust jacket. 1843. N/A. ITEM: Land Deed "Know all Men by these Presents, That J. John Horswell of Seekonk in the County of Bristol and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Merchant, in consideration of Two Thousand eight hundred Dollars, paid by John P. Battey of Providence..." DATE: Nov. 17, 1843 COMMENTS: The deed is for land bordering Robin Lane on the north, Isaiah Hoyt on the northeast, County Road to Pawtucket on the east, and Old Boston Road, or Road to Attleboro, on the south. CONDITION: Tears to all edges. Old there old paper tape repairs, and repairs I have made with archival document repair tape, a thin non-yellowing acid free paper tape. The reverse is age toned on the outside folds. Light chipping to the edges and corners.20 x 17 inches opened up and laid flat. Land Deed. wb8


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    $116.00

    An original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill and his wife, Clementine, arriving at Ascot on 15 June 1950 where Churchill’s horse, Colonist II, was running in the Ascot Gold Cup

    London: Fox Photos, 15 June 1950. Photograph. This original press photograph captures Winston S. Churchill and his wife, Clementine, arriving at Ascot on 15 June 1950 to watch Churchill’s horse, Colonist II, race in the Ascot Gold Cup. The image, measuring 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm), is a gelatin silver print on matte photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scratches, its sole flaw being a .5 in square missing from the photo’s surface at the top edge. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Fox Photos” and a typed caption reading “Mr and Mrs Winston Churchill whose car was involved (though not seriously) in an accident en route to the course, today attended the Ascot race meeting to watch Mr Churchill’s Colonist II run in the Gold Cup. PHOTO SHOWS: - In Ascot topper instead of the proverbial bowler WINSTON CHURCHILL arrives at the course to the cheers of the bystanders. Mrs. Churchill accompanies him.” The Fox Photos caption is dated “June 15th 1950”. Owning racehorses was a later life manifestation of Churchill’s lifelong love of horses. At Sandhurst, training for the cavalry, Churchill graduated second in the arduous riding competition. At Omdurman he participated in “the last significant cavalry charge in British history”. He was a talented polo player who did not play his last game until age 52. And as soon as his finances allowed in the last decades of his life, Churchill kept a stable of racehorses and found some success as an owner and breeder. In 1949 the septuagenarian Churchill purchased Colonist II, a three-year-old French race horse. Colonist became something of a sensation, winning eight of his nine races in 1950, including one in which King George VI’s horse was running. Churchill’s new hobby was not met with approval by all. Clementine wrote to a friend “I do think this is a queer new facet in Winston’s variegated life. Before he bought the horse (I can’t think why) he had hardly been on a racecourse in his life. I must say I don’t find it madly amusing.” (letter of 28 May 1951) When Colonist’s trainer suggested that Colonist be put up to stud Churchill allegedly retorted, “To stud? And have it said that the Prime Minister of Great Britain is living on the immoral earnings of a horse?” (quoted in Kay Halle, The Irrepressible Churchill, p. 241) Churchill continued to own horses throughout the remainder of his life, 38 in total, but none quite matched the success of his first. This press photo originated from Fox Photos Ltd. of London. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.


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    £8.00

    Hey, Look Me Over [Vintage Piano Sheet Music] by Cy Coleman [Lyrics by Carolyn Leigh] Recorded by Ronnie Hilton

    Published by Edwin H. Morris & Co. Ltd., 52 Maddox Street, London 1960. 1960., 1960. Vintage piano sheet music in colour paper covers with photograph of Ronnie Hilton to the front cover. 11'' x 8½''. Contains 4 printed pages of score for the piano and voice with words. Without any tears and in Very Good clean condition. Member of the P.B.F.A.


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    $189.00

    An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 3 July 1945, delivering his final campaign speech of the General Election that ended his wartime premiership on 26 July 1945

    London: Keystone Press Agency, 3 July 1945. Photograph. This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 3 July 1945 delivering his final campaign speech of the 1945 General Election. Churchill is depicted here with a borrowed hat befitting his borrowed time; his wartime premiership ended weeks later on 26 July 1945. The image, measuring 8 x 6 in (20.3 x 15.2 cm), is a gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp with some edge wear, creasing to the corners, and light scuffing and spotting visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Keystone Press Agency Ltd.”, a stamp reading BILDSERVICE, handwritten notations, and an original typed caption. The caption is titled ”CHURCHILL AT WALTHAMSTOW STADIUM”, is dated “3.7.45.” and reads: “MR. CHURCHILL KEEPS THE SUN OUT OF HIS EYES WITH A BORROWED HAT WHILE MAKING HIS SPEECH.” The General Election of July 1945 was Britain’s first since 1935. Churchill began campaigning on 26 May, just eighteen days after Britain celebrated VE Day. His first speech characterized the moment, opening with words of celebration and pivoting to a hard turn to the reality at hand: “The great victory in Europe has been won. Enormous problems lie before us.” This photograph was taken on 3 July at the end of a two day election tour of the London area during which Churchill was met with both adoring crowds and detractors. In his speech before, some among the crowd “were rowdy and there was some stone-throwing”. (Gilbert & Arnn, Documents Vol XXI, p 1810) Though Churchill had led the nation to victory, the Conservative party’s ability to achieve postwar reconstruction was viewed with growing skepticism. On 3 July Churchill delivered his final campaign speech before a crowd of over 20,000 at a stadium in Walthamstow at which a vehemently hostile faction was present. His 28-minute speech was interrupted throughout by catcalls and booing, as well as by cheers and applause. The environment was stormy enough that Churchill remarked upon the crowd’s participation many times throughout his speech. At the end of his speech he directly called out the opposition, “Where I think the booing party are making such a mistake is dragging all this stuff across the practical tasks we have to fulfil [sic]… They are going to be defeated at this election in a most decisive manner. Their exhibition here shows very clearly the sort of ideas they have of free speech.” (Complete Speeches, Vol VII, p 7203) The opposite of the outcome predicted by Churchill would shortly come to pass. Churchill had warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. Now, despite his personal popularity, his Conservative Party would cost him the premiership. On 26 July 1945, despite having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour’s landslide General Election victory over the Conservatives. He would be relegated to Leader of the Opposition for more than six years until the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpaced Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo once belonged to a working newspaper archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives, physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.


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    £6.00

    Le Tortillard (Fox Trot) [Musicians Vintage French Sheet Music for the Trumpet] by V. Marceau (Music)

    Published by Éditions Musicales V. Marceau, 82 Faubourg, Saint-Martin, Paris circa 1950. 1950., 1950. Vintage sheet music without any covers. 10¾'' x 7''. Single sheet music with printed score on one side only. In Very Good condition. Member of the P.B.F.A.


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    £20.00

    Festa Major (Paso Doble) Les Hommes dans L'Arène | Toujours Heureux (Fox Trot) [Musicians Vintage French Piano Sheet Music] + Individual Sheets Of Music For Parts of the Orchestra by José Réno | F. Ouvry (Music)

    Published by Éditions F. Ouvry, 61 Avenue de Breteuil, Paris circa 1936. 1936., 1936. Vintage sheet music in maroon and cream printed paper covers. 10¾'' x 7''. Contains 28 pages folding sheet music including the covers. In Very Good condition. Different front and rear covers loosely inserted. Member of the P.B.F.A.


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    $49.50

    Poster for a 1972 Exhibit at Gallery A-402 by Zuck, Timothy

    Valencia, CA: Gallery A-402, 1972. 9 1/2 x 12" poster mailer, photographically illustrated at recto. Folded twice for mailing. Addressed to a well-known Southern California bookseller. Poster for an exhibition at the important student-run conceptual art gallery. Near fine.


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    €10.00

    Tarik Kiswanson (announcement) by Kiswanson, Tarik

    Paris: Fondation Ricard, 2018 Card size: 15 x 21 cm. Text printed both sides black on white. Fine. Announcement. No Binding. Fine. Ephemera.


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    $23.76

    Praeludium C-dur Fugue D-Moll für Orgel / Prelude in C major Fugue in D Minor for Organ by Bruckner, Anton; Wöss, Josef V

    Universal Editions, 1954. Very Good, Pages clean and bright, binding tight. Cover shows signs of wear. Name of prior owner on cover, Same day Shipping.. Sheet Music. Very Good. Sheet Music.


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    $25.00

    Diez años de trabajos de zapa japoneses en las Indias orientales neerlandesas. Informe oficial del gobierno de las Indias orientales neerlandesas sobre las actividades subversivas japonesas en el archipiélago durante el último decenio

    New York: Oficina de información de los Países Bajos, 1942. 139p., wraps somewhat soiled, tear at top of spine, ex-private library with card pocket inside back cover. Report by the Netherlands government in exile on Japanese propaganda activities in the Netherlands East Indies (now Indonesia) in the years prior to Japan's invasion of the islands during WWII.


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